The Surprising Link Between Language and Depression

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Skim through the poems of Sylvia Plath, the lyrics of Kurt Cobain, or posts on an internet forum dedicated to depression, and you’ll probably start to see some commonalities writes Emily Patsko. That’s because there’s a particular way that people with clinical depression communicate, whether they’re speaking or writing, and psychologists believe they now understand the link between the two.

According to a recent study published in Clinical Psychological Science, there are certain “markers” in a person’s parlance that may point to symptoms of clinical depression. Researchers used automated text analysis methods to comb through large quantities of posts in 63 internet forums with more than 6400 members, searching for certain words and phrases. They also noted average sentence length, grammatical patterns, and other factors.

What researchers found was that a person’s use (or overuse) of first-person pronouns can provide some insight into the state of their mental health. People with clinical depression tend to use more first-person singular pronouns, such as “I” and “me,” and fewer third-person pronouns, like “they,” “he,” or “she.” As Mohammed Al-Mosaiwi, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology at the University of Reading and the head of the study, writes in a post for IFL Science:

“This pattern of pronoun use suggests people with depression are more focused on themselves, and less connected with others. Researchers have reported that pronouns are actually more reliable in identifying depression than negative emotion words.”

What remains unclear, though, is whether people who are more focused on themselves tend to depression, or if depression turns a person’s focus on themselves. Perhaps unsurprisingly, people with depression also use more negative descriptors, like “lonely” and “miserable.”

But, Al-Mosaiwi notes, it’s hardly the most important clue when using language to assess clinical depression. Far better indicators, he says, are the presence of “absolutist words” in a person’s speech or writing, such as “always,” “constantly,” and “completely.” When overused, they tend to indicate that someone has a “black-and-white view of the world,” Al-Mosaiwi says. An analysis of posts on different internet forums found that absolutist words were 50 percent more prevalent on anxiety and depression forums, and 80 percent more prevalent on suicidal ideation forums.

Researchers hope these types of classifications, supported by computerized methods, will prove more and more beneficial in a clinical setting.

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